"Eastern Gray Squirrel at Enchanted Forest Park"

WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY – ENCHANTED FOREST PARK, FL

The eastern gray squirrel, or grey squirrel (depending on region), (Sciurus carolinensis), is a tree squirrel in the genus Sciurus native to the eastern and midwestern United States, and to the southerly portions of the eastern provinces of Canada. The native range of the eastern gray squirrel overlaps with that of the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger), with which it is sometimes confused, although the core of the fox squirrel’s range is slightly more to the west.

A prolific and adaptable species, the eastern gray squirrel has been introduced to, and thrives, in several regions of the western United States.

As the name suggests, the eastern gray squirrel has predominantly gray fur but it can have a reddish color. It has a white underside and a large bushy tail. Particularly in urban situations where the risk of predation is reduced, both white- and black-colored individuals are quite often found.

Like many members of the family Sciuridae, the eastern gray squirrel is a scatter-hoarder; it hoards food in numerous small caches for later recovery. Some caches are quite temporary, especially those made near the site of a sudden abundance of food which can be retrieved within hours or days for re-burial in a more secure site. Others are more permanent and are not retrieved until months later. It has been estimated that each squirrel makes several thousand caches each season. The squirrels have very accurate spatial memory for the locations of these caches, and use distant and nearby landmarks to retrieve them. Smell is used once the squirrel is within a few centimeters of the cache. It is one of very few mammalian species that can descend a tree head-first. It does this by turning its feet so that the claws of its hindpaws are backward pointing and can grip the tree bark.

 Eastern gray squirrels build a type of nest, known as a drey, in the forks of trees. The drey consists mainly of dry leaves and twigs; Spanish moss is also useful where it’s available. It may also build a nest in the attic or in the exterior walls of a house, often to the consternation of the homeowner. In addition, the squirrel may inhabit a permanent tree den.

Eastern gray squirrels are more active during the early and late hours of the day, and tend to avoid the heat in the middle of a summer day. They do not hibernate.

 

Subject Photo exif Data

    Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Digg this

    26 thoughts on “Eastern Gray Squirrel

    1. stinken little "puff rat" They tear up my lawn cushions and plant nuts in my gutters, But they are cute, and I hear they taste like chicken

    2. haven't had squirrel since Metropolis Illinois in 1960. tasted gamy. My mom freaked when they told her what it was.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    TO PREVENT SPAM, PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING. THEN PRESS * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Skysa App Bar